Triumphant Plutocracy – Episode #11

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An insiders view on how bankers, corporations, and lawyers took over the United States Government and became the “Rulers of America” during the Gilded Age.  Written with true authority by a man who had a front row seat for it all, R. F. Pettigrew was the first senator from the state of South Dakota, and he made no friends during his time in the US Congress. These are his memoirs.


In this episode – Continued reading of Triumphant Plutocracy by Richard Franklin Pettigrew,  including Chapter XIII: The United States Supreme Court.  The Origins of the Constitution Redux.  Jefferson Not a Party to the Constitution.  The Ten Amendments to the Constitution.  The Importance of the Ninth and Tenth Amendments.  The Supreme Court: A Dangerous Usurper.  Jefferson’s Writings Reveal That the Tenth Amendment Was Written to Constrain the Supreme Court.  Marbury vs. Madison.  Thomas Jefferson: America Dead and Secretly Buried in 1819.  “It Is the Part of a Good Judge to Enlarge His Jurisdiction.”  Supreme Court Never Meant to Veto Laws as Unconstitutional.  Why the Supreme Court Abandoned the Practice of Each Justice Giving an Opinion.  The Notorious Dartmouth College Decision.  Rights of Property Holders Supreme to the Rights of Man.  The Judiciary Usurps the Powers of Congress Forever in 1857.  The Supreme Court Drunk with Power.  Tenth Amendment Destroyed by the Supreme Court.  The First Amendment Completely Gutted by 1920.  The Entire Bill of Rights Destroyed by the Supreme Court.  Laws Passed in Time of War Inevitably Enforced in Times of Peace.  The Supreme Court Has Always Been a Political Body.  What Is the Matter With the Courts?  Pettigrew’s Possible Remedies for the Supreme Court.

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Triumphant Plutocracy – Episode #9

tp-logo-wip

An insiders view on how bankers, corporations, and lawyers took over the United States Government and became the “Rulers of America” during the Gilded Age.  Written with true authority by a man who had a front row seat for it all, R. F. Pettigrew was the first senator from the state of South Dakota, and he made no friends during his time in the US Congress. These are his memoirs.


In this episode – Continued reading of Triumphant Plutocracy by Richard Franklin Pettigrew,  including Chapter X: Who Made the Constitution.  The Plutocracy Becomes the Masters of Government.  Plans Prepared By Business Men to Stabilize Business Interests.  The American Idea of Government Was the British Idea of Government.  The Constitution Was Not Drawn Up to Safeguard Liberty.  The Constitutional Convention Held In Secret.  The Secret Debates of the Constitutional Convention Published a Half-Century Later.  Thomas Jefferson Sent to France During the Drafting of the Constitution.  Constitution Protects Slavery.  States Refused to Ratify the Constitution.  Jefferson Returns From France to Throw Weight Behind Amendments. Reading of Chapter XI: Lawyers.  Lawyers In Domination of the Federal Government.  Why Are Both Houses of Congress Packed With Lawyers?  Why Are Most of Our Presidents Lawyers?  Why Are Most Judges Lawyers?  A Lawyer, By Training and Practice, Serves the Ruling Class.  A Good Lawer Studies “Precedent.”  Precedent is Simply the Continuation of the Status Quo.  Precedent Based on the Common Law of England.  Trained in the Wisdom of the Seventeenth Century.  Lawyers Can Not Think Into the Future, So They Protect Things As They Are.  The Lawyer Is One of the Few Who Can Take a Bribe, and Call It a Fee.  Common Law Derived From the Landed Aristocracy of Great Britain.  Pettigrew Recounts Stories of Fellow Senators Taking Bribes While In Congress.  The Practice Excites Little Comment Because It Is So Common.  Lawyers Should Be Excluded From the Bench, and All Branches of Government.

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You can also stream the episodes from Archive.org
For more information on the author of this book Click Here.